Warning: getimagesize(): Filename cannot be empty in /homepages/12/d502827397/htdocs/wp-content/plugins/wp-open-graph/output.class.php on line 306

Don Schindler

Executive Reputation Coach & Digital Marketer

Category: advocacy (page 2 of 3)

How To Handle Negative Comments On Your Twitter Profile

Twitter is more the wild west of commenting (though not as bad as YouTube) and you are sure to get negative comments out here. In fact, one of my favorite skits by Jimmy Kimmel is his featured Mean Tweets where celebs read some of the meanest tweets about themselves. I’m a big fan of Clay Matthews and his mean tweet was classic.

jimmy-kimmel-live-mean-tweets-NFL-edition

Courtesy of Jimmy Kimmel Live and YouTube

I believe that people are more apt to stay things they would never say on other public networks is because it’s hard to trace who people are on Twitter. They could be themselves and have their name tied to it or they could be using twitter anonymously and none of their family or friends even know they are there.

So without the filters of these other people, tweets can sometimes be flippant, sarcastic, rude, vulgar, joking, or crazy. They might be just trying to get a rise out of you – it could be just about anyone on the other side of that tweet.

So a lot of the rules that I gave you about really understanding who you are talking to is important BEFORE you even think about engaging in a dialogue.

First things first, do these. 1. Evaluate the Messenger 2. Use your listening skills 3. Ask more clarifying questions 4. Be respectful and polite 5. Use your experiences as examples 6. Be on offense, not defense 7. Don’t use jargon 8. Provide links to experts 9. Craft a thoughtful response 10. If you don’t know, tell them 11. Find some common ground 12. Thank them for speaking with you.

I want to add a few more things about the evaluation. If you click over to their profile and don’t see a large following – DO NOT THINK THEY ARE NOT INFLUENTIAL. Just because they don’t have many followers, doesn’t mean that they don’t influence others.

You should treat everyone with respect and understand that their tweets are limited in characters so things they may be trying to stay are coming out as harsh or blunt. They may not mean it – it’s just the limitations of the network. Definitely pay attention to the emoticons. 🙂

But if you determine the negative comments are real, here’s how I would handle it.

twitter-response

Ray Prock is a farmer friend and I would never think that he sucks. Just an example.

1. Can others see it? If someone responds to me after I post and they have replied to me like (@donschindler you suck!) if the @donschindler is first then the only people that can see this post is me, them and the people that follow both of us.

twitter-with-period

The period means everyone can see this tweet.

Now if they put a . in front of the handle like this .@donschindler then all of their followers can see it. My followers wouldn’t see this because they only see what I post and as long as I don’t respond in a manner with the . then only they will see it and our mutual followers. Continue reading

How To Handle Negative Comments On Your Facebook Page

weigel-dairy-facebook-page

This is an entirely different realm because this is a public business page. If you are accepting comments (which I think you should) then you can expect this type of thing happening.

Now if you are listening to the major social media marketing companies and experts, they are going to tell you that you need to do a couple of things right away.

  1. Response immediately.
  2. Acknowledge the issue.
  3. Apologize sincerely.
  4. Try to take it offline.

I completely recommend this line of thinking for an actual customer who’s upset with your product or service.

But that’s not always the case when it comes to farm/food company pages. You may be getting negative comments from people who have never used your product or service and never will. They think they can come and tear your business a new one based on their philosophy of life. And I don’t think these type of negative comments should be handled in this fashion. Continue reading

How To Handle Negative Comments On Your Facebook Profile

facebook-messenger

Better to have the conversation in Messenger.

Most Facebook profile comments are coming from people within your friend group. You had to have accepted their “friendship” or connection at some point.

The only time this wouldn’t happen is if a friend of yours shared your post to their friend list (which is how things go viral so you hope this happens) or if you are using a hashtag in a public post and someone found it.

Now remember what I’ve said before about how to handle negative comments first – 1. Evaluate the Messenger 2. Use your listening skills 3. Ask more clarifying questions 4. Be respectful and polite 5. Use your experiences as examples 6. Be on offense, not defense 7. Don’t use jargon 8. Provide links to experts 9. Craft a thoughtful response 10. If you don’t know, tell them 11. Find some common ground 12. Thank them for speaking with you.

Personally, this needs to be handled delicately and I always treat these people as friends first. Lots of listening, apathy and polite conversation.

But I also keep in the back of my mind that Facebook is most likely going to be the digital diary of my life that I leave behind for multiple generations of my family. It’s not that it needs to be perfect – in fact it makes it a whole lot more authentic than say a written autobiography but I try and keep it positive and happy. Because I am positive and happy in my life. No need to air the dirty laundry we all have here in a public place. Continue reading

You just received a negative comment online, now what do you do?

fight-fight-fight

Whoops! Guess you pissed somebody off. Cause you just got a seriously negative comment on your post. Or did you?

Listen, these things are going to happen. Especially if you are making a difference in the world. There are always going to be naysayers and critics. You can see them as a worrisome burden or an outstanding opportunity. Or you can see that as what they really are in most cases – attention.

Much like there’s no such thing as bad press, negative comments mean that people are paying attention. How you deal with that attention especially negative attention says a lot about your character.

I know it’s tough to not put on your gloves (I love to box and counterpunching is how a lot of  fights are won according to my trainer) but this is a social world and everything you say can be spread virally. With this in mind, we’ve put together some guidelines that may help you when you run into negative feedback.

First things first:

Evaluate the messenger – definitely go check out their profile before you answer. Most detractors have a lot of things on their profile that will let you know that they aren’t here to just ask a few questions. They are here to argue with you about what you do. As my friend Kim Kirchherr says you don’t have to attend every argument you are invited to. If there isn’t any chance to persuade or give them insights into what you do, there’s no reason to engage.

Use your listening skills – with just text, it’s really hard to tell if they are being inquisitive or sarcastic. People forget commas and write like they talk. Say it out loud in a couple of different tones. I always try and think that most people have good intentions but they don’t write them that way.

Ask more questions to clarify what they are talking about – don’t just make assumptions. You could be off by a mile and a half and you just wasted a ton of your time and you didn’t answer their question.

Be respectful and polite – farmers are some of the most respected people on the planet. Don’t soil yours as well as your fellow farmers’ reputation by getting into a name-calling, ALL-CAPS shouting match.

Use your own experiences as examples – you can prove how you take care of your animals by posting pics and videos of them. You’ve got tons of stories of leaving your warm bed to stay up with a sick calf. That’s a big deal and people sympathize. Continue reading

Which social media marketing metrics should I be measuring?

building-advocates

Learning who your advocates are and starting a relationship with them is the most important thing.

Everything should lead back to sales if it can.

So you need to know what the definition of sales is for your organization.

Is it a specific product or service? Or is it getting people to an event?

Whatever it is, you should tie that to your efforts.

Once you have that defined, then you calculate your costs for each of your marketing pieces. Add them altogether and that’s your marketing spend.

Take your marketing sales (return), subract your marketing investment, and divide by the investment.

(Return – Investment)
Investment
 

So if your return is $30,000 and you spent $10,000 on your marketing, you would have an ROI of 2. But if your return was $15,000 on the same spend amount, you would have an ROI of .5. You want to try and maintain an ROI over 1.

Now this is a little different for us in the dairy industry when we don’t have a specific product to sell in a specific area – we are beholden to all dairy products.

So how would I measure our success?

I believe it is through Share of Voice and our Advocate Program.

 

consumer-choices

Consumers have thousands of choices to make daily.

What is Share of Voice?

Quantitative: This is an overall number evaluation. i.e. if milk is mentioned among 10 times per every 100 references to our market (including competitors over the same time period), the share of voice would be 10%.

Qualitative: This is a quality analysis of the number evaluation placements. i.e. if milk gets mentioned in the NYT or Washington Post or CNN/Fox News, then it gets scored higher than if it was mentioned by a blogger website. The reach of the Tier 1 is much higher than the Tier 2 website.

Tone: Was it positive or negative? This is difficult to do for machine analysis because many things we say when we use negative terms actually could mean we really like it. i.e. I could kill for some ice cream.

There are lots of things that could influence Share of Voice.

I believe that if we create more online advocates, we could help positively influence our Share of Voice to the positive.

And if there’s more Share of Voice to the positive, we could increase sales.

But remember this is only one of things influencing our Consumer Confidence efforts.

So I would focus my metrics on building advocates.

Who are our advocates?

People that love dairy products and don’t mind voicing their favorable opinion of them. We know that many people love our products – milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, ice cream and whey. Good stuff, right?

Many people probably don’t know, however, that there are lots of people out there voicing their opinions about how much they dislike all of these things. Does it have an effect on sales? Most definitely. Especially as younger generations turn to the web to get information on the things they think they should be consuming and liking. Check out this report from Zuberance about the importance of advocates in your marketing.

Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
Your CRM tool is your favorite marketing tool when it comes to your advocates. It can hold their contact information and the notes on your conversations with them. It can track your interactions with them whether these be via email or social media.

So the main metric you want to be tracking in the CRM is “are you adding more advocates with their correct information?”

There are lots of ways to get an advocate’s information into the CRM and we’ll discuss that in another post.

Email Marketing (Newsletter/blasts)
Email marketing is still one of the most efficient and effective ways to market. So this would be my next best metric when it comes to outreach for share of voice. Email metrics I would track are:

  • Sends: How many emails are you sending?
  • Click-Throughs: Are advocates clicking on the Call-to-Action in the specific email?

Website Stats
Of course this is your home on the Internet – is it doing what it can to capture those advocates that visit?

  • Email Collection – The main Call-to-Action is getting them into your CRM database so you can email them when you need to.
  • Traffic – Your web traffic helps see how often people are visiting and what they are doing once there. More visitors are great but look to make sure they are spending quality time.
  • Traffic Referrals – Where are people coming from? Google, direct, email, social media? You can measure all of this and should.

Social Media
Social media is still a bright and shining star in communication vehicles. You need to be there because people expect it especially to answer questions and keep them entertained with humor, recipes and insights into our products and how they are produced.

  • Click-Throughs to CRM – Are you engaging the advocates, and creating a stronger relationships through email and social media?
  • Engagement – How often are they sharing, commenting and liking your content?
  • Follows/Likes – How many people are liking your Facebook, following your Twitter profile or following your Pinterest and/or Instagram profiles?

So these are a few things that I would be interested in reporting out. I think it’s dangerous to really push things like impressions and reach (especially the numbers coming from Facebook and Twitter) because they aren’t going to be at the same level as traditional media reach (TV, radio, newspaper) but those are overblown as well.

Stick to what you have – to me, this means growing your number of advocates and getting them in your Word of Mouth Advocacy Program to influence positive Share of Voice.  I believe this will lead to more sales.

So am I missing some metrics here? I would be happy to add more.

Love this infographic from Jay Baer and Zuberance.

Influencers-versus-Advocates-jay-baer

Older posts Newer posts

© 2020 Don Schindler

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑