Don Schindler

Digital Strategy & Executive Social Media Trainer

Category: marketing (page 1 of 9)

How to use Instagram Stories For Your Farm or Business

Wait, Don, what’s Instagram? Go here to find out at Instagram for your farm. Then come back to this story.

Instagram Stories is simply just a way to add multiple photos/videos together to make a story. But here are three reasons I think you should be using it along with a quick tutorial.

1. It’s hot right now. Things don’t last too long in internet land and right now people are checking out the new feature. There are very few people posting a lot of Instagram Stories so you have a fighting chance to be up at the top of everyone’s feeds (that follow you).

Instagram Stories are hot!

 

2. It’s really simple to use and has almost all the same features as Snapchat without the confusion of Snapchat’s interface.

It's simple to use.

So how do you use it?

Open Instagram.

Click on the + sign at the top left.

add-instagram-stories

 

The big button in the bottom is for photos and video – just click once for a photo and hold for video.

record-button-instagram-stories

 

Once you are finished with the photo/video, it will let you edit the screen by writing with the pen, marker or glowing marker. Or you can add text and then move it around or make it larger/smaller by pinching and pulling the text.

edit-instagram-stories

add-doodle-instagram-stories

add-text-instagram-stories

 

After you finished adding text or doodles, then you can cancel or save (down arrow) or use the Check Box to add to your 24 hour story.

Easy as pie.

3. Stories don’t last forever on it (only 24 hours) so you can have fun and tell a quick story about the farm. Here’s some farms doing so cool stuff with it.

Only 24 hours

Now you can exclude some people from seeing your stories.

https://www.instagram.com/waymar_dairy/

https://www.instagram.com/idfa/

https://www.instagram.com/thelittlehouseonthedairy/

https://www.instagram.com/udayoungcooperators

https://www.instagram.com/nyfarmgirls

https://www.instagram.com/vetpracticevahs

Unfortunately you can’t like Stories yet but you can message people direct through Instagram and give them some love that way.

If you go to the three little dots as the bottom, you can do some cool things there as well.

You can Delete, Save Video, Share as Post or go into Story Settings.

adjust-settings-instagram-stories

Once there, you can Hide the Story from people or allow message replies from Everyone, People You Follow, or turn it Off.

hide-settings-instagram-stories

Have fun using it and let me know if you have any questions. You can hit up at don.schindler at dairy.org or  use Facebook/Twitter/Instagram.

Snap Chat, iMovie, and Dealing with Negative Comments top my 2015 posts

It’s always kinda cool to go back and see what really worked with my posts and what didn’t. Things that I think people would really want to see aren’t normally the ones that they do. And, of course, there are older posts that just seem to work in an evergreen way. I didn’t include those, just the ones I wrote this year.

Anyway, here they are.

you-wont-have-a-brand

Customers don’t care about your brand if you don’t care about them.

1. It’s not “If You’ll Be Disrupted”, it’s “When You’ll Be Disrupted” – Crowd Companies at SXSW 2015

This posts hits on the disruption of the Collaborative companies and it hit a nerve with the industry. I’ve also become a member of Jeremiah Owyang’s Crowd Companies Innovation Council and gotten to meet a lot of smart people working to disrupt not only competition but their own companies in order to figure out where the world is going. Getting to peek under the hood at AirBnB and Uber was pretty cool as well.

 

ask-the-farmers

Ask The Farmers

2. Is dairy farming a one-sided conversation?

With this post, I spoke about how sometimes it seems that I’m on the defense when it comes to conversations about food and farmers. And I talk about how to overcome that but where to reach out to for help. Essentially, it’s about who are the dairy farmer advocates that you can rely on in the digital world and I list them out and link to them.

 

fight-fight-fight

3. You just received a negative comment online, now what do you do?

We teach a few classes on how to handle tough questions and this post came out of that class as well as a few others. It runs down the process but also includes a helpful flowchart of how to handle a negative comment. If you treat comments like this as objectively as you can, then you can calm down your emotional response, which is extremely tough to do.

 

snapchat home screen

4. Show Me Your Farm in Two Seconds. How to Set Up Snapchat For Your Farm

Now I didn’t write this article because I’m not a Snap Chat user. I mean I have snap chat but none of my friends really use it (because I’m old). But Jamie, my co-worker does, and she lays out a great argument of why you should be using it (because the younger people do) and then how to set up it up.

 

5. How do you make a movie with the iMovie App on the iPhone 6?

I loved this post. Not because it’s a great post but I’ve had so much fun with the staff making movies on my iPhone 6. It’s so easy to do and it doesn’t take that long to do them. Why not edit out the boring parts and get right the good stuff. With iMovie, it’s not as hard as you think.

So that’s it for 2015. Can’t wait to see what rocks everyone’s world in 2016.

Digital Amnesia Epidemic; Amazon Can’t Ever Die; How Intimate is Your Brand?

All the adults are doing it. 65% of adults use social networking sites. Can you guess what that same percentage was just 10 years ago? http://pewrsr.ch/1G9PbDS

 

FB or TV? Nielson says that using Facebook alone now reaches more Millennials and Hispanics over running ads on the 10 most watched TV networks combined. http://bit.ly/1jI4BEN

 

Nothing in life is guaranteed. What would happen to our books, movies and music if Amazon dies? http://theatln.tc/1X9ufRB

 

You’re suffering from digital amnesia. 40% of people Google info before trying to remember it and 25% of people forget the answer right after using the information. http://dailym.ai/1NMDvJP

 

A somewhat longer (but worth the time) talk from Todd Henry on the way we work…and what’s not working. http://bit.ly/1hJ6Zdp

 

When people love brands…it’s because they tend to have these three qualities. https://dairyhub.force.com/069d0000002JMmS

How to put words on a picture using your iPhone – use Word Swag

wordswag-logo

Add text to photos

I love putting a few lines of text over a picture – and I’m sure I’ll get some haters over that statement. But really it’s one of the most effective way to get people to share your photo and read your information.

Recently I created this image that got some traction online so I thought I would share with you.

I do apologize to all the PC/Android users out there. So there Word Swag is only on iphone but there are alternatives link Phonto, which is awesome.

So here’s the image I created – I got the image off of a free photo website (here are many more websites to use that don’t require costs and have open use policies.

 

wordswag-finish

Final image that I shared on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram (and Tumblr)

 

1. Get the Word Swag app.

Then open the app and select the image you want. You can pick from their designs or you can grab something from your camera roll.

Helpful hint: if I grab a photo online then I send to my phone via Airdrop or text message it.

wordswag-home

 

2. Find the photo in your Photo app.

wordswag-find-photo

3. When you select the photo, you’ll in photo-editing mode.

You can choose to crop it (for Instagram) or leave it whole. Continue reading

4 tips on how to make a good presentation – or at least make it suck less.

oratium-presentation-training-tamsen

Oratium’s Tamsen Webster presenting at Hubspot.

If you follow my blog or social media feeds, then you know I have a low tolerance for bad meetings and presentations.

But I think bad presentations are the worst. They are probably the most evil way to kill your co-workers and clients.

Why are they worse than bad meetings?

Because with a meeting, I can always chime in – try and move it the way I want it to go – or at least I can engage.

But with a presentation, I’m a hostage. Many times I’m staring down a 70-page fully loaded deck with bulleted 12-point fonts, unreadable charts, nasty clip-art and cartoon transitions.

I can’t do anything. I can’t go anywhere. I can try and sneak a peek at my phone or act like I’m taking notes on my laptop while I’m really checking Instagram, Facebook or email. But I can’t escape the stock photos of business hurdles and diversity handshakes. My eyes….my eyes!!!

So last week I traveled to Boston to check out the team from Oratium, Tamsen Webster and Jonathan Dietrich, Presentation Training.

They promised me that I would look at presentations differently. That I would have, as Tamsen so eloquently put it,  “a framework to work within” for my future presentations.

Let me tell you. I was skeptical.

I’ve been presenting in front of crowds since 2006 – I’ve read a lot of books and have done my fair amount of research on how to give good presentations. I’ve gotten great reviews – in fact, I pride myself on the ratings and the comments. I even get laughs, which always surprises my wife. Guess I’m not too funny at home.

But then Tamsen and JD showed me a real presentation framework, broken down into easy steps that would help me make my presentations so much better.

Now I can’t give you all the details. Sorry.

Come on, it’s their intellectual property and they’ve made a good business of helping companies and their salespeople get much better at this.

What I can give you is some of the framework and a place to start along with Tamsen and JD’s contact info so you can get in touch if you want. I highly recommend it especially if you have salesforce that needs to be selling a whole lot more.

Their big idea was pretty simple.

Presentations should “powerfully land a small number of big ideas.”

Let me say that again because this is usually the opposite of many presentations I see (and have made).

POWERFULLY LAND A SMALL NUMBER OF BIG IDEAS.

Such a great way to think about your presentations.

oratium-handout

Oratium handouts you get with the training.

So what tips can I pass along on how to do this with your presentations:

1. Stop being you-centric and be audience-centric.

Cut out the crappy, bulleted “my company” slides or the “who I am” slides (I’m guilty of this and it stops today) at the front of your deck. If you really want to get the audience’s attention – start with their problem as quickly as possible.

But, Don, they won’t know who we are and we need to be credible. We debated this, too.

First, you are in the room so you must be credible to someone to get there.

Second, they aren’t going to care about anything you say – they are focused on them and not you. You want them to pay attention to you then talk about them and their problems. You can work your who we are into the back of the deck when you are presenting the solution.

I know this sounds like commons sense but I’ve seriously used the same presentation in front of one audience and then turned around and used it on another without changing much but the opening slide.

Because my slides were about me – not them.

2. Have a clearly defined ACTION that you want the audience to take at the end of the presentation.

This is how you measure whether you are being effective or not.

This made me laugh.

I’ve defined my measurement in the comments I received after or the fact that audience members would come up and want me to speak at another event.

But did that solve the audience’s problem (which I don’t even know if I really defined well) and did it help my company’s goals (in a vague way – maybe).

Let me tell you that their pyramid system to help you define the action is worth the investment.

3. If you are going to get the audience to take an action, then they must “believe” something different than what they currently do.

Another tip that hit me like an ACME safe. JD repeated this statement a couple of times to get it to really sink in.

“The audience will think differently about you if they first think differently about themselves.”

I never thought that the only way I could get an audience to believe in me is to first get them to think differently about themselves.

Of course I thought that the audience trusted me – look how awesome, smart, interesting, passionate, prepared (sometimes) I am – BTW, those are the examples we came up in class of what we tell ourselves about how our audience feels about us.

What a crock. We have no empirical evidence that our audience thinks this but we do know with lots of evidence that they are thinking about themselves a lot. Just like you are doing right now.

Until I focus completely on them, their problems, and lead them to a solution that they can visualize and own – they aren’t going to think too highly of me.

Did I tell you that Tamsen and JD didn’t pull any punches on us? It was some serious tough love I needed to hear.

4. To get people to believe something different, then you need to give them the knowledge to back it up.

This is your data and illustrations. But you can’t beat them over the head with facts and figures. You must deliver the knowledge in a way to have emotional pull – you need to appeal to both sides of the brain because people make decisions irrationally (right side of the brain) then justify the decision rationally (left side of the brain).

If you’ve never read “Predictably Irrational” by Dan Ariely, I totally recommend it. Great book and backs up this line of thinking on why people do what they do.

Now these are just four tips from an all-day workshop – I wish I could give you more but I promised I wouldn’t in a public way.

The framework they gave us, the online tools I can start using, the insights into how the audience’s mind works are invaluable and I recommend that you reach out directly to Tamsen and JD to schedule some time to chat with them about helping out your team.

I was blown away by how polished and thorough their presentation program was and will be recommending them in the future.

Good luck in your future presentations but if you really want to take your talks to the next level then get in touch with them.

 

 

Older posts

© 2017 Don Schindler

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑