Don Schindler

Executive Reputation Coach & Digital Marketer

Tag: How to (page 2 of 2)

How do you set up a blog on wordpress.com or transfer your wordpress.com website to wordpress.org?

Our Big Barn Collapsed After A Wind Sheer

Our Big Barn Collapsed After A Wind Sheer

Normally, I do a step-by-step process with the How To’s but right now there are plenty of other blogs that walk you through the process of setting up or moving your wordpress blog.

I’ve moved several blogs from different hosts and I can tell that it gets easier and easier but that doesn’t mean it’s so easy that I would let my dog take a whack at it.

Remember your blog is your home (or barn) on the internet and it’s no fun to rebuild that home (or barn) when you accidentally knock it down yourself.

So here’s what I would do if I were doing and I didn’t have the knowledge of blowing up my past blogs.

I would probably pay for it.

That’s hard for me to say. I’m a cheap guy (you can ask my wife). I like to figure things out on my own and then take a crack at it.

Am I successful? It really depends on if I think I can give up without someone knowing.

So if you are in the process of setting up a blog, I would recommend the free services of WPbeginner. I haven’t used them yet and I’m not an affiliate but everything else they say on the website is legit so why would they lie about free setup.

All you have to do is buy the host and the domain (you can get both from wordpress) and just have them set it up.

They also have a couple of posts on the do it yourself process.

Michael Hyatt (I’m a big fan of his podcasts “This is your life”) also has a video on the overall wordpress set up that’s supposed to take only 20 minutes.  I’ve never set up a new site that fast but, like I said, things are getting easier.

Now when it comes to moving your wordpress.com to a wordpress.org website, you may think that I’m going to say “hey, you can do this.”  You know, because you’ve been blogging for a while and you know how wordpress works.

But again if I didn’t have my experience, I think you’ll be better off letting the experts handle it. For $129.00 per blog with a system they called “Guided Transfer“, I think that’s a steal. I’ve spoken to developers about these kind of things and most of them charge that for an hour’s worth of work.  They will not be able to move your blog in less than an hour.

I would rather you let the experts handle the move and you concentrate on what you are good at doing. Working the farm and telling the world your story – that’s so much better then fighting to get your website back up and running.

What do you think? Are you going to tackle this project by yourself or let someone else do it?

 

 

How do you set up a YouTube Channel for your farm or business?

YouTube-Transparent-Logo-3

YouTube is the 2nd Largest Search Engine

While I go into the benefits of setting up a channel and posting videos in “What can YouTube do for your Farm or Business?”, I’ll repeat the main topics here.

Videos can:

  • bring people closer to the real thing.
  • see how the farm runs.
  • help you get found in a sea of information out there
  • make a big impact without costing you a lot of money

But now we have to see how this YouTube thing works. Let’s get to it.

1. Creating an Account on Google

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Let’s get started by creating an account. Google owns YouTube so you will need to set up a Google account first at google.com. If you already have a Google account, you’re ahead of the game.

S2_Existing_gmail_account_sign_in_S2

S4 filling out account info S4

2. Uploading a Photo

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Once all your account information is filled out, it’s time to upload your photo or take it with a webcam.

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Choose a picture where people will be able to identify your face clearly. This picture will be used for all of your Google accounts.

 

3. Sign into Youtube.com

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Now that your account is set up you need to switch over to YouTube and sign in.

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You will be asked to re-enter your password to the account you just created on Google.

 

4. Select your Topics

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What do you like? A list of topic and subtopics will pop to help get you started with videos you might enjoy watching. These topics will not make or break your suggested videos so you can skip this step if you like.

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Once you start searching for videos YouTube will suggest similar videos for you on its own.

 

5. Select My Channel and Create Your Channel Name

In the upper right hand corner click the drop down menu and click My Channel.

You will be asked if you would like to use your Google account name or if you would like to create a name for your YouTube Channel.

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If you have a blog or brand name, it would be helpful to keep your channel name the same instead of your personal name. Once you have decided what to name your channel you will want to fill in some useful information for your future viewers.

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YouTube provides a helpful checklist to get you started.

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Fill in the about section with a description of your channel, links (blog, website, etc.) and other channels you would like to feature. When you choose a picture for your channel art pick something that represents the theme of your channel.

 

6. Select your Account Settings

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After you go through your checklist you will want to read through your settings.

S21 Go thru Settings

 

You want viewers to find your videos and channel with ease, so set your YouTube settings accordingly.

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When you are done with your account settings take a look through the features on your Dashboard.

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Channel settings are as important as your account settings.

The video manager and analytics will come into play once you upload a video.

 

7. Upload a Video

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There are multiple places to upload your first video from your main page, but they all work the same way.

After your initial upload, you will only have the main option next to your search bar.

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Once you are at the uploading screen, you will have the option to upload, use a webcam, create a slideshow video using photos on your computer, record a Google + Hangout (a topic for another day) and make edits to the video you are uploading.

Select a file or record your video.

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If you selected a file, you will need to wait for it to upload, but while you wait fill in all your video information.

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After your video uploads choose your thumbnail and if your video needs stabilization. You will only receive this option if your video is shaky.

 

8. View Your Video

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You can now view your video, but if you opted for stabilization this is not the final video. You will have an orange banner across your screen with the remaining time on stabilization. If the stabilization distorts your video you can delete it and upload it again.

Below your video you will find all of your videos information displayed, info and settings tab, and postproduction tabs (captions, enhancements, annotations, etc.). If you are happy with the way everything looks, let’s take a look at your analytics.

9. Analytics

Right now you won’t have any analytics, but this is where you will be able to view how well your videos are doing.

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You can view anything from your most current metrics from last week to a lifetime (every video you posted) of videos. It is important to see how well your content is performing in order to find out what content your audience likes or does not like.

You can even see how long someone watched your video. If your posting 5-minute videos but your audience only tunes in for 2 minutes, you now know to make shorter videos. Well that’s the basics.

Let me know in the comments below if you have any questions or need something explained in more detail.

How should you set up your Google Analytics dashboard for your farm website or blog?

final-google-custom-dashboard

How do you get a snapshot Google dashboard?

I’ve been following Christopher S. Penn for years and am a big advocate for listening to his weekly podcast with John Wall called Marketing Over Coffee.

I learned how to set up a custom dashboard in Google from Chris so some of this custom dashboard set-up comes from him, a few others and my own added info. So props to Christopher for showing me how to do this so I can show you how to set up your dairy website/blog analytics?

Before you set up your Google Analytics dashboard, you really need to determine the goals of your website. If you need help with setting up Goals and Conversions, then check out my post on Setting Goals.

If you’ve never set up analytics on your website/blog, you’ll need to do that first. You can learn how to do that from Google with their setting up Google Analytics on your website post.

To build a custom dashboard, it’s fairly easily. But why would you want to, you know, since Google already provides large tabs with the analytics on them. Mainly because you probably don’t have a lot of time to be digging through all those analytics. Your own dashboard will help you get right to the meat of your needs.

1. Log in to Google Analytics

It’s as simple as going to Google.com/analytics

2. Select the profile

You might not have to select a profile if you only have one website. If you are already on the Audience Overview, just skip to Step 3.

3. Select New Dashboard

This will be on the top left navigation. You can create up to 20 custom dashboards.

audience-overview

Look at the top left navigation for Dashboard

4. Select Blank Canvas

You’ll be able to create and move all the widgets you create so the dashboard will look exactly as you want it to look.

blank-canvas

5. Select Add a Widget

Once you click, add a widget you’ll get a pop-up on the page that will help you define each and every widget you want to create.

First you’ll need to fill out the Widget’s name.

The second thing you’ll need to select is what type of widget reporting this will be. Do you want:

Metrics – just a simple figure or calculation.
Timeline – a visual timeline with metrics.
Geomap – a visual map color coded for the metrics.
Table – several metrics tied together in a table format.
Pie – a visual pie chart of the metrics.
Bar – a bar chart of the metrics.

If you select Standard, these metrics will be tied to the time slot you select on the top right.

If you select Real-Time, these metrics will be tied to only real time data and will constantly be changing depending on the real time traffic to the website.

Once you select the visual, the “show the following metric:” will change depending on the visual.

You can also use “Filter this data” to show/don’t show different dimensions with different expressions like “containing”, “exactly matching”, “ends with”, etc…

The last option, “Link to Report or URL” gives you the possibility to link directly to a standard Google Analytics report or a URL within the widget.

Then you would click “Save”.

Here are the following widgets I would set up for dairy industry or farming website. These will make it easier on you to see at a snapshot what is going on.

6. Real Time Active Visitors – how many people are on the website right now.

active-visitors

Name the widget “Active Visitors”
Select Real-time 2.1 Counter
Select Following Metric: Active Visitors
No dimension
No filter this data
No link
Click “Save”

active-visitors-complete

The above image is what the widget should look like.

7. Unique Visitors – how many unique people have been on the site in the timeframe at the top right

unique-visitors

Name the widget “Unique Visitors”
Select Standard 2.1 Metric
Select “Unique Visitors”
No filter
No link
Click “Save”

google-dashboard-1

The above image is what the widget should look like. As you probably noticed, this widget is then on top of the first widget you created. You can drag this widget down under the other widget by simply grabbing the top bar of the widget.

8. Unique Visitors by Source – where are my unique visitors coming from (direct, search engines, websites, etc…)

pie-unique-visitors-by-source

Name the widget “Unique Visitors by Source”
Select Standard “Pie”
Select “Unique Visitors”
Select “Source”
Show up to 5 slices
No filter
No link
Click “Save”

pie-unique-visitors-by-source-complete

The above image is what the widget should look like.

9. Unique Visitors by Content Page and Contact Us (Goal 1 Conversion Rates) – this will tie how many of your unique visitors visited a certain page and then also converted one of your goals

table-pages-unique-visitors-by-goal-1

Name the widget “Unique Visitors and Content Pages by Contact Us” if that is your goal.
Select Standard “Table”
Select “Page”
Select “Unique Visitors”
Select “Contact Us (Goal 1 Conversion Rate)” if this is your goal
10 rows is fine
No filter
No link
Click “Save”

table-pages-unique-visitors-by-goal-1-complete

The above image is what the widget should look like.

10. Unique Visitors and Average Time on Page per Keyword – this will show you how many unique visitors used what keyword to get to your website and how long they stayed on the page.

unique-visitors-avg-time-keyword-table

What does “not set” mean? Well, it’s kinda confusing but Google tries to clear it up with their explanation. To me, it’s tough to tell but basically Google is missing the dimensions it needs to determine the keyword.

What does “not provided” mean? This means that the user was logged into Google and was securing using search so the keywords are not passed along to Google Analytics. This is for privacy but you can “unlock” these keywords through these steps by KISSmetrics.

Name the widget “Unique Visitors and Avg. Time on Page per Keyword” if that is your goal.
Select Standard “Table”
Select “Keyword”
Select “Unique Visitors”
Select “Avg. Time on Page”
10 rows is fine
No filter
No link
Click “Save”

unique-visitors-avg-time-keyword-table-complete

The above image is what the widget should look like.

11. Contact Us (Goal 1 Conversion Rate) – this will show you how many times your goal converted.

conversion-goal-1

Name the widget “Contact Us (Goal 1 Conversion Rate)” if that is your goal.
Select Standard “2.1 Metric”
Select “Contact Us (Goal 1 Conversion Rate)”
No filter
No link
Click “Save”

conversion-goal-1-complete

The above image is what the widget should look like.

12. 3 min or more (Goal 2 Conversion Rate) – this will show you how many times a unique visitor stayed on the site for 3 minutes or more.

conversion-goal-2

Name the widget “3 min or more (Goal 2 Conversion Rate) ” if that is your goal.
Select Standard “2.1 Metric”
Select “3 min or more (Goal 2 Conversion Rate) ”
No filter
No link
Click “Save”

conversion-goal-2-complete

The above image is what the widget should look like.

13. Unique Visitors and Goal Completions – this will show in timeline form the number of unique visitors and how many times there was a goal completion.

timeline-unique-visitors-goal-completions

Name the widget ” Unique Visitors and Goal Completions”.
Select Standard “Timeline”
Select “Unique Visitors and Goal Completions”
Select “Unique Visitors”
Select “Goal Completions”
No filter
No link
Click “Save”

timeline-unique-visitors-goal-completions-complete

The above image is what the widget should look like.

There you go – eight different graphs to quickly view how your website is doing on your own personal dashboard.

final-google-custom-dashboard

How do you get a snapshot Google dashboard?

And of course, if these don’t meet your needs you can add many more widgets customized to your specifications.

In a future post, I’ll go over the main sections of Google Analytics that are important to dive into as well like Content – All Pages and Landing Pages.

And I’ll also look into custom reports – there are many good ones out there that other people have created – and how to add them as well.

If you have any questions, or want to add your own, just let me know by leaving comments below or contact me via your favorite social net.  All my connections are on the right.

Internet Marketing 101: How do I set up Google Analytics?

While I’m waiting for the answers from my friend, I hooked up Google Analytics to their site.

Setting up Google Analytics

1. You have to have a gmail account.  BTW, I love gmail.  I switch off Microsoft Outlook in Jan and I won’t be going back.  It’s like when I switched from skiing to snowboard.  With the flexibility and ease of Gmail, there’s just no going back.  And you should also have a Google profile.  They are easy to set up and you can link to your websites and other profiles on the web.  Check out mine at Don Schindler Google Profile.

I would also recommend that you set up a gmail for your business.  I use this gmail account for lots of different pieces like Adwords, Adsense, Analytics, Checkout, etc…because then you don’t have to worry about mixing personal and business accounts.

2. Go to Google Analytics.

Go to Google Analytics

Go to Google Analytics

3. Do the whole “Sign Up now” thing.

Google Analytics Sign Up Page

Google Analytics Sign Up Page

4. Then put in your root website like http://www.yoursite.com/ and your time zone.

Put in the URL of your website

Put in the URL of your website

5. Fill out your personal info and select your country.

Put in your Personal Info

Put in your Personal Info

6. Agree to their Terms of Service.

7. Then fill out the rest and Google will give you a code.  It will look something like this.

<script type=”text/javascript”>
var gaJsHost = ((“https:” == document.location.protocol) ? “https://ssl.” : “http://www.”);
document.write(unescape(“%3Cscript src='” + gaJsHost + “google-analytics.com/ga.js’ type=’text/javascript’%3E%3C/script%3E”));
</script>
<script type=”text/javascript”>
try {
var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker(“UA-7611885-1”);
pageTracker._trackPageview();
} catch(err) {}</script>

Google will give you the code.

Google will give you the code.

8. Then you take this code and put it on every page of your site.  This can be done through a footer file or part of your template (as long as it is not inside a frame).  Or you will have to put it in manually on every page.

9. Once you’ve put the code in and uploaded the file or all the changed pages onto the site, then click “Continue”

10. Status should change if you’ve set up the code properly.  This one doesn’t because I don’t own www.yoursite.com.  If yours doesn’t change, then click Edit and then click Check Status on the top right of the page.  This will allow you to ping Google and check the status of the page.

Google Analytics Report Page

Google Analytics Report Page

If you still have problems here, go out to your website and click on “View” in your browser, then select Page Source.  Do a search for “google-analytics”.  If it doesn’t show up, then you don’t have Analytics on the page and you need to check your code.

That’s basically it.  Once it says, your status is OK then you should start seeing visitors.  Here’s a look at the dashboard of my friend’s site.

Google Analytics Dashboard Top

Google Analytics Dashboard Top

Next time, we’ll discuss how to read Google Analytics next time.

How do I make a Google Map for my company?

After our last seminar, Social Media Mania, I received an email from an attendee about how to make a Google Map specific to their business. You know the kind where you have the little blue icon instead of a red one.

Here’s what I wrote her.

If you don’t have an account with Google, then sign up. It’s easy and free. I would recommend you make the gmail account for your company name like yourcompany@gmail.com. This way it can be easily transferred to another marketer down the road.

Once you have an account, go to Google Maps.

There will be a tab call My Maps. Click on it.

Google My Maps

Click Create A Map.

Make a name for your map.

Make sure it’s set to Public.

Google Map for MediaSauce

Search for your location.

When it gives the red location spot, click on the it on the map.

Google Map for MediaSauce

It will say “Save to My Maps”

Click that link.

It will say “Which map would you like to save to?”

Select the “named” map.

You’ll have your map.

Google Map for MediaSauce

Then to add it to your website.

Click on “Link to this page” on the far right corner of the map.

There you can get the link or the HTML code to add to your site.

Google Map for MediaSauce

Now here’s something cool. Google lets you edit your business information and I totally recommend this.

To do this, get out of your Maps and then do a search for your business. Hopefully, it pops up.

Then click on the red dot on the map that shows your business location. There will be an “edit” button.

Click that link and set up your business.

At the end, they will call your business to verify you are the owner. They will give you a four-digit code. Put that in and your business will be on the map with more information than just a location.

Google Map for MediaSauce

Now you know how to do it yourself.

Google Maps makes it easier on people to find your location and anything that makes it easier on your customers is worth putting on your website.

Here’s an example.

And here’s one with an actual path from location to location.

If your locations are moving or you want people to enter their information and then it just show up on a map, MediaSauce has done this for customers as well.

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